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last updated Nov. 16, 2009
published July 25, 2000
Trilateral Statement on the Middle East Peace Summit at Camp David
July 25, 2000
Read more:  Bill Clinton, trilateral statement, Camp David, peace process, Oslo accords, Yasser Arafat, Ehud Barak, resolution 242, resolution 338
Summary: The Trilateral Statement on the Middle East Peace Summit states that, under the auspices of President Clinton, Prime Minister Barak and Chairman Arafat met at Camp David to try to reach an agreement on permanent status. They were not able to reach an agreement, but they agreed on some principles to guide their negotiations. These are outlined in the Trilateral Statement.
News
Israel moves to launch university in West Bank settlement
Jan. 21, 2010
"I take full responsibility," Barak tells Gaza flotilla probe
Aug. 10, 2010
Abbas awaits US clarification over peace talks offer
Feb. 6, 2010


Multimedia
Al-Jazeera Int: PLO agrees to peace talks
al-Jazeera Int: Riz Khan with Gideon Levy
Riz Khan: Is one state solution viable?
Palestinian leaders agree to indirect talks with Israel


Documents
Camp David Accords (1978)
Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu Addresses a Joint Session of the US Congress, May 24, 2011
George Bush's Speech after the Gulf War


Publications
Foreign Aid and Development in Palestine - Phase I Report
il-Istaytan Tahadi il-Salaam
The Stone and the Olive Branch: Four Years of the Intifada, from Jabalia to Madrid


Background
Oslo accords
Camp David II
Solutions for Israeli-Palestinian conflict


Resources
"After Annapolis," Bitterlemons Dec. 3, 2007
"Netanyahu: economics not politics is the key to peace," Haaretz
"Netanyahu's economic peace," Bitterlemons, Nov. 24, 2008


Document Text
President William J. Clinton
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak
Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasser Arafat


Between July 11 and 24, under the auspices of President Clinton, Prime Minister Barak and Chairman Arafat met at Camp David in an effort to reach an agreement on permanent status. While they were not able to bridge the gaps and reach an agreement, their negotiations were unprecedented in both scope and detail. Building on the progress achieved at Camp David, the two leaders agreed on the following principles to guide their negotiations:

    1) The two sides agreed that the aim of their negotiations is to put an end to decades of conflict and achieve a just and lasting peace.

    2) The two sides commit themselves to continue their efforts to conclude an agreement on all permanent status issues as soon as possible.

    3) Both sides agree that negotiations based on UN Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338 are the only way to achieve such an agreement and they undertake to create an environment for negotiations free from pressure, intimidation and threats of violence.

    4) The two sides understand the importance of avoiding unilateral actions that prejudge the outcome of negotiations and that their differences will be resolved only by good faith negotiations.

    5) Both sides agree that the United States remains a vital partner in the search for peace and will continue to consult closely with President Clinton and Secretary Albright in the period ahead.

Document Text
President William J. Clinton
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak
Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasser Arafat


Between July 11 and 24, under the auspices of President Clinton, Prime Minister Barak and Chairman Arafat met at Camp David in an effort to reach an agreement on permanent status. While they were not able to bridge the gaps and reach an agreement, their negotiations were unprecedented in both scope and detail. Building on the progress achieved at Camp David, the two leaders agreed on the following principles to guide their negotiations:

    1) The two sides agreed that the aim of their negotiations is to put an end to decades of conflict and achieve a just and lasting peace.

    2) The two sides commit themselves to continue their efforts to conclude an agreement on all permanent status issues as soon as possible.

    3) Both sides agree that negotiations based on UN Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338 are the only way to achieve such an agreement and they undertake to create an environment for negotiations free from pressure, intimidation and threats of violence.

    4) The two sides understand the importance of avoiding unilateral actions that prejudge the outcome of negotiations and that their differences will be resolved only by good faith negotiations.

    5) Both sides agree that the United States remains a vital partner in the search for peace and will continue to consult closely with President Clinton and Secretary Albright in the period ahead.

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