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Sunday Sept. 23, 2012 1:26 PM (EST+7)
Egypt's Morsy says Palestinian plight key to Egypt-Israel peace


Read more: Mohammed Morsy, Egypt, Camp David, peace agreement, negotiations, peace process, occupation, withdrawal, 1967 borders, Muslim Brotherhood

RAMALLAH, September 23 (JMCC) - Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy indicated in an interview published Saturday by the New York Times that the status of his country's 1978 peace accord with Israel depended on the plight of Palestinians.

He also said that, as a signatory, the United States bore responsibility for unfulfilled clauses of that accord that called for Israel to withdraw from the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The statements seemed intended to reframe Egypt's relationship with the United States and Israel which under his predecessor Hosni Mubarak had been seen as ignoring Israel's actions towards Palestinians in favor of US military and other aid.
“As long as peace and justice are not fulfilled for the Palestinians, then the treaty remains unfulfilled,” he said.

He made no apologies for his roots in the Brotherhood, the insular religious revival group that was Mr. Mubarak’s main opposition and now dominates Egyptian politics.

“I grew up with the Muslim Brotherhood,” he said. “I learned my principles in the Muslim Brotherhood. I learned how to love my country with the Muslim Brotherhood. I learned politics with the Brotherhood. I was a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood.”

He left the group when he took office but remains a member of its political party. But he said he sees “absolutely no conflict” between his loyalty to the Brotherhood and his vows to govern on behalf of all, including members of the Christian minority or those with more secular views.

“I prove my independence by taking the correct acts for my country,” he said. “If I see something good from the Muslim Brotherhood, I will take it. If I see something better in the Wafd” — Egypt’s oldest liberal party — “I will take it.”

He repeatedly vowed to uphold equal citizenship rights of all Egyptians, regardless of religion, sex or class. But he stood by the religious arguments he once made as a Brotherhood leader that neither a woman nor a Christian would be a suitable president.

“We are talking about values, beliefs, cultures, history, reality,” he said. He said the Islamic position on presidential eligibility was a matter for Muslim scholars to decide, not him. But regardless of his own views or the Brotherhood’s, he said, civil law was another matter.

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